2 Day Move Without Pain Somatics Workshop – York, United Kingdom

I get a lot of emails from people asking me when I’ll be teaching classes or workshops in their area.  They want personalized help with their exercises and daily routine. They’ve bought my book or DVDs and would like to have me see “if they’re doing the exercises correctly.”

The best way to get that help is in person. I’m usually busy teaching clinical trainings or Somatic Exercise Coach trainings, but now, for those of  you who want to learn directly from me, ask me questions and be assessed in person…here’s your chance!

Learn to move freely, efficiently and intelligently  – a 2 day Somatics workshop for the general public

Experience two days of movement classes with me, Martha Peterson, author of the book, Move Without Pain and Certified Hanna Somatic Educator. I will teach you all the most importanIMG_2442t basic Somatic Exercises – and more – from Thomas Hanna’s “Myth of Aging” series. You will enjoy a comprehensive experience of Somatic Movement, pandiculation and how to apply the improvements you experience in your body to your daily life. There will be group discussion, plus plenty of time for questions and answers about Hanna Somatics and how to address your particular muscle pain condition.

If you’ve been working with the Somatic Exercises and would like individualized attention from me, come learn to deepen your Somatics practice. If you’ve “tried everything” for your back, neck, shoulder or hip pain, and have only experienced short term relief, come learn a new perspective on movement and muscle pain and begin building your Somatics practice.

Participants will learn:

  • How to recognize the three stress reflexes (red light, green light, trauma) in yourself and others.
  • How muscles become habitually tight and painful and contribute to recurring injury, poor posture and inefficient movement.
  • How your movement habits and reflexive responses to stress contribute to conditions such as low back pain, neck, shoulder, hip and joint pain, sciatica, and chroP1020371nic headaches.
  • How to release tight, painful muscles safely without stretching.
  • A daily routine of easy, safe and profoundly effective movements that, when practiced daily restore muscle control and awareness and eliminate chronic muscle pain.

Each participant will receive an audio practice CD and a DVD of the basic Somatic Exercises which you will learn in the workshop.

Click here for a full workshop description and to register.

This workshop is of special interest to anyone struggling with chronic functional muscle pain: back, neck, shoulder, hip, knee or foot pain – or limited movement. The workshop is appropriate for people of all ages and fitness levels. No previous experience of Somatic Exercises is necessary.

What Is Freedom, Really? Somatics and ALS.

A first year clinical student was approached by a woman with ALS. She requested that my student work with her so she can retain movement. This woman shared with her that her family pressures her to do physical therapy and occupational therapy treatments, yet her experience is that all the yanking and stretching they do with her only leaves her exhausted, tight and in pain. She wants something different, something more gentle and more gradual.

My student guides her through gentle movements – some passive, some active – encouraging her to do what she can do and to move in a way that gives her pleasure: small movements of the neck or shoulders, gentle flexion and extension of the feet and legs. There’s not much movement, yet the client, who can no longer speak due to her condition, writes out that she feels better. She wants to return for more.

What is she seeking?  She wants to feel herself until she can no longer feel. She wants to control what she can control until it is gone. She wants to sense freedom until she has lost it. To feel herself and to sense herself through movement is the purest form of freedom a Soma has and she is doing all she can until it is taken away from her. Her mental attitude bespeaks an intention that is extraordinary and her commitment to herself is one I don’t often see – even in those who have the ability to control their movement and choose what they want to do.

Most of us are fortunate to have a choice about how we want to live, move and express ourselves. Many think that they don’t have a choice, or that it’s “too complicated” to make the choice that would bring health, happiness and an inner sense of well-being. My student’s client gives me pause to consider how precious it is just to sense my own body.

Back Pain After Gardening? Keep Reading…

One of my clinical students from the UK, Karyn Clark, wrote the following article, which I want to share with everyone on this blog. For all you gardeners out there who are gearing up for the summer season, read this! It will give you some pointers about how to recuperate from a day of wonderful, yet repetitive gardening.

11160009_870839839648700_6727914488985578643_nThe author, pandiculating in her garden.

It struck me whilst out gardening over the weekend how many people like me jump at the chance of a nice sunny day to get out into the garden and cram in as much as possible before the rain comes or it’s time to go back to work. We pull, we dig, we shovel, we hit.

For many, we do more physical activity in those 4-6 hours than we have done since the last time we were out in the garden. People spend a lot of time reaching, bending and reaching, stretching up and reaching, pushing their bodies that little bit further to get to that last branch or weed at the back of the flower bed. They dig and plant, bend and pull. All in all, they spend the majority of the day with their back in an over-stretched forward flexion position. Then it happens…the stiffness, the tightening, the inability to move any further because of the back pain. For most it’s that deep aching across the low back. For others it’s more intense radiating further into the buttocks or down the legs.

So what do we do? We hobble back into the house, chuck our clothes in a heap and sink into a nice hot bath. “Ahhhhhh,” it feels so good! The pain is easier; we relax, as do the muscles, deeply.After a good half an hour we get out. Our poor relaxed muscles are required once again to jump to it and do their job, stabilizing and moving the joints of the body. As we get dried and dressed we sadly realize that the stiffness and pain is actually still there.“STRETCH” we think “I need to stretch!” NOW STOP! Lets go back over this:You’ve spent all day stretching, bending, reaching, attempting to contort yourself into positions that Iyengar would be proud of. Is stretching really the answer? I’m afraid not.

The science of stretching versus pandiculation

So you’ve been stretching inadvertently all day, evoking the “stretch reflex,” also called the myotatic reflex. It is a pre-programmed response by the body to a stretch stimulus in the muscle. When a muscle spindle is stretched an impulse is immediately sent to the spinal cord and a response to contract the muscle is received. This reflex protects muscles from tearing.

By stretching further we continue to evoke and deepen the stretch reflex, yet many people when in pain are so desperate to alleviate it they continue to just push it that bit further in a vain attempt to release the pain. The best idea is to  stop stretching and try something different: pandiculation.

If the muscle is contracted and stuck in that pattern of contraction we need to reset the brain; after all it is the brain and the nervous system that controls the muscles, so lets start with that. We need to re-set something called the Alpha Gamma feedback loop, also known as Alpha Gamma Co-activation. This feedback loop ensures optimum functioning of the muscle’s length from contraction all the way to relaxation.

A muscle starts at a certain length. When the muscle is stretched, the muscle spindle stretches and the fibres fire more strongly. When the muscle is released from the stretch and contracts, the muscle spindle becomes slack, causing the fibres to fall silent. The muscle spindle is rendered insensitive to further stretches of muscle. To restore sensitivity, gamma motor neurons fire and cause the spindle to contract, thereby becoming taut and able to signal the muscle length again.

When we pandiculate we start by tightening into the contracted pattern that the muscle is involuntarily stuck in and then lengthening out of it in order to retrain the muscle to relax. This re-sets the Alpha-Gamma Co-Activation loop. To pandiculate means to “yawn.” When we yawn we contract and then slowly release, thus relaxing the muscle. Animals pandiculate, babies pandiculate, many adults pandiculate upon waking.

So the next time you’re gardening, firstly be kind to yourself, take regular breaks, lay down and pandiculate throughout day to help prevent the back from going into spasm. And if it it does, don’t stretch!

When your back starts to ache, lie down (like Karyn in the photo at top) and do the basic somatic movement called Arch and Flatten. This simple Somatic Exercise will teach your back muscles to release and relax. You can do it on the lawn in the middle of your gardening day. Allow the movement to flow with your breath and make sure it feels good. Arch and Flatten just may become your best friend!

Movements That Don’t Feel Good For My Hip

As promised, in my last post I shared my daily Somatics routine. In this post I’ll talk about the movements that don’t feel good for my body and hip, as well as the movements that I enjoy and which help me feel strong without stressing my hip and causing pain.

To start, here’s what I’ve learned about my labral tears:

Because I can’t fix the structural problem I need to listen to my body, move in a way that feels good and stay away from movements that cause pain. I had to get past my self-competitive nature and embrace acceptance and the possibility that I can be strong, healthy and happy without pushing my body into places that don’t serve it. It’s calling letting go of your ego. It’s not easy.

Movements that aren’t pleasant for me:

Running. Though I like to run a block, walk, run another block, then walk, I can only do this a few times. Not having equal stability in my right hip simply causes my brain and muscles to come down just a bit harder on the right side. I wind up quite sore for a day if I do this and it puts unnecessary stress on my hip joint. It’s not worth it.

“Core strengthening:” Sit ups, Pilates mat exercises. Why? Because the more I tighten my “core” the more it hurts my right hip. Sounds odd, right? Not really. Many people with a labral tear also have a cyst on their hip. Their hip joint structure is just a little bit off. Not enough to cause pain, but enough that create some sensitivity that others without tears don’t have.

Just look at an anatomy chart and you’ll see where the abdominal muscles insert into the pubic bone and into the pelvis and you’ll get a better idea of how excessive strengthening exercises can actually create pressure and tightness into the hip joint.

The best abdominal/core strengthening for me is functional body weight movement. I love the movements of Exuberant Animal. They’re fun, functional, creative and strengthening.

Fast twisting movements: Zumba doesn’t work for me. It’s simply too fast and one is never able to get to the full range of the muscle, nor have enough time to learn to do the movement properly. Slow hip movements are great, but super fast? It serves no purpose that I can see.

Stretching: Stretching only makes muscles tighter. This is old news. I pandiculate – never stretch. And it means that I move in a comfort range that is right for me. I pandiculate as much as possible throughout the day.

I have had to become extremely aware of my tendency to revert to the original pattern that probably caused the tears in the first place: the Trauma Reflex. When stress hits me, I, too, will revert to my most deeply familiar habit – the one that was invoked so long ago. Don’t worry. The beauty of the human brain is that we can improve awareness of our movement habits and change them in the moment in order to become self-correcting, self-actualizing and self-healing. We can start all over again every minute of the day.

It’s extremely helpful to become aware of how you emotionally respond to stress (to be “somatic” simply means to be aware – from the inside out – of how you respond to your life on all levels). Do you cringe into that hip? Do you tighten your back, hunch your shoulders? Does that hip begin to ache when you’re stressed? Have you never considered that your emotional or psychological state is connected to how your muscles move?

The lesson here is to learn to listen to yourself, sense the information your brain is giving you about your body and move in ways that create pleasure, learning, growth and strength.

My Daily Somatics Hip Pain Relief Routine

In my last labral tear update I wrote that an habituated Trauma Reflex is always a part of the posture of someone with a labral tear. Whether you get surgery for your tear or not it is critically important to regain full muscle function of the muscles of the somatic center if you’re ever going to move efficiently again.

My daily pain relief tips for hip pain

Pandiculation – first thing in the morning! I never get out of bed without pandiculating. I wake IMG_3791up and take a few minutes to yawn out my arms and legs – my own natural version of the Human X – “hike” my hips up and down, and twist the center of my body, letting my head and neck move with the movement (like the Washrag).

A daily Somatics routine of between 10 – 15 minutes, morning and evening.

  • Arch and Flatten – sometimes moving into the Flower (especially if I’ve done a lot of computer work that day).
  • Cross Lateral Arch and Curl
  • Back Lift
  • Arch and Curl with psoas release
  • Side Bend – I prefer the “arm sweep variation
  • Washrag (or Steeple Twist)
  • Walking Exercises

A varied routine, with movements such as:

  • Hip Lift and Reach
  • Propeller
  • Arch and Curl with Psoas Release (find it here on Laura Gates’ DVD)
  • Arch and Flatten with Cactus Arms
  • Side lying shoulder and hip circles (relaxed shoulders help release the hips)
  • Seated Somatics
  • Standing Somatics (from my book)

Pandiculate often during the day! I make movements up: rolling my hips, shoulders, squatting, Screen shot 2013-09-23 at 4.14.33 PMreaching my arms up, twisting our my center, swinging my arms, bending to the side.

Stand up frequently if you’re doing desk work. I stand up frequently and do “Reach to the Top Shelf,” sometimes 15 times a day!

Sun Salutation – done very slowly and somatically. I take all the time I need to sense the flow of the movement without stretching or holding stretches. I do about 3 rounds 3-4 times a week.

Walking, walking and walking.  Walking integrates my movement and allows me to coordinate the whole body. Walking is, after all, the most important movement any human being needs to be able to do easily and efficiently.

Stair climbing or hill walking. Incorporating stairs or a hill allows me to strengthen and coordinate my hips, back, legs and waist within a functional movement. I can really tell what’s out of balance when I go up and down stairs. It gives me a chance to go back, notice what’s not moving as freely and see how I can tweak it.

In my next post I’ll share with you movements that don’t feel good for me considering that I have a labral tear. They might feel good to those with no structural hip issues, but not for me! So I honor what my body has to tell me and stay away from them. There are so many movement choices, why stick with something that doesn’t feel good?!

 

 

How Hanna Somatics Helps Me Move Well Despite Labral Hip Tears

It’s time for an update.

Several years ago I wrote several blog posts about hip pain, labral tear surgery and how to help alleviate hip pain – not as a quick fix, but for the long term. Since then I’ve had countless emails from readers asking advice about hip pain and labral tears: which exercises are best for it, can Hanna  Somatics really help and advice on whether to have labral tear surgery or not.hips

So where do I stand now that I’ve had labral tears for several years, a very active schedule and haven’t had surgery?

I’m moving really well. I feel strong, I am still quite flexible and I know how to honor my limits to keep myself out of pain. You see, I am a poor candidate for surgery (I also have osteoarthritis in my hips from years of dance training and injuries), so there has only ever been only one clear choice for me: to incorporate the exercises, concepts and principles of Hanna Somatics into my daily life. This includes awareness of my emotional responses to stress, my postural habits and my daily movement habits.

That means that I have had to walk the talk and be the example of what Hanna Somatics has to offer those in pain: the ability to become self-aware, self-monitoring, and self-correcting in their movement and muscular control. I know which activities help me and which ones don’t and I know that if I “push on through” because I want to be competitive, and I ignore how my body is feeling, I will be sore for a few days afterwards.

I was diagnosed with labral tears after recovering from a skiing accident, which resulted in an ACL tear. As a Somatic Educator, I knew that my tears were the cumulative result of years of Sensory Motor Amnesia as well as minor, but very important, imbalances in the center of my body. For some people labral tears occur suddenly due to an accident or over time due to overuse; baseball players, martial artists and dancers are athletes who frequently suffer from labral tears, all due to repetitive movements.

The Trauma Reflex contributes to labral hip tears

If you have a labral hip tear, you’ve probably had an accident, injury, surgery, or performed repetitive IMG_3857actions – all of which evokes a sudden and powerful reflex called the Trauma Reflex. The brain, the command center of the muscles, loses its ability to contract and lengthen the muscles of the waist and trunk voluntarily and equally. You find yourself slightly tilted to one side, the pelvis twisted and leg length  a bit  uneven. Your gait changes and smooth walking or running becomes a thing of the past.

Here is what I have advised my readers:

If you have a labral tear and decide to have surgery, the surgery won’t fix the muscular imbalance that you undoubtedly have in the center of your body. Only you and your brain can do that through sensory motor retraining. Then, once the tear is fixed, it’s important to restore full muscle function, balance and coordination through Clinical Somatics sessions and daily Somatic Exercises.If you don’t, you just may experience continued tightness in that hip, or aches and pains in other areas of the body due to compensation.

If your goal is to avoid a hip replacement (or put it off indefinitely), which is possible if the structure in your hip socket is damaged, then the smartest thing you could do is to get the muscles which attach into and move the hip socket to release and relax. This is what I have done. Reduce excess muscle tension and free up your movement. This will take the pressure off the injured area and help you regain freedom of movement.

No matter what you decide, improved somatic awareness and control is what will change the course of your recovery from one of pain and limited movement to one of greater movement and self-control.

So what does my daily practice look like? There are so many Somatic Exercises to learn and choose from, yet some are what I call the “non-negotiables.” All this in my next blog post…

 

The Top Three Myths About Hip Pain

Myth #1 – Your hip pain is due to arthritis

Sometimes hip pain is due to severe arthritis and very often it’s not.

When you go to a doctor with hip pain their job is to give you a diagnosis because this is what most people want. Unless you are given an X-ray, which proves beyond a shadow of a doubt that you have arthritis, the doctor has no way of knowing whether your pain is due to arthritis. I was once told that due to my age, I had arthritis. The doctor insisted he was right, when in fact, he wasn’t. Arthritis is often a “garbage pail diagnosis.” You quite possibly have tight muscles that are in a state of Sensory Motor Amnesia.

And sometimes you can have arthritis but be moving well with no pain.

Myth #2 – Your hips are weak

It’s time to retire this myth in particular. Those coming to me with hip pain have very little movement in the center of their bodies. Their hips don’t sway, their gait isn’t smooth and fluid. The problem is not weakness. It’s tightness.

When muscles learn to stay tight (due to stress reflexes), they lose their full function. They can no longer contract and release fully as a healthy muscle should. Muscles in a state of Sensory Motor Amnesia (SMA) have lost their physiological ability to release.  They are far from weak; they are, in fact, so strong that they cannot relax!

Doctors frequently pescribe physical therapy due to “weak muscles.” Strengthening muscles that are in a state of SMA only makes them worse, as I discuss in this post about Tiger Woods.

Myth #3 – Surgery is the only option for hip pain

The medical profession looks at tight hip joints and sees a structural problem. Somatic Educators look at tight hip joints and see a functional problem. Doctors don’t look at movement and patterns; they focus on separate body parts in an effort to “fix” them. Somatic Educators look for “what’s not moving” when someone walks and teaches them to improve sensory motor control of the muscles in order  to create more release in the center. This can create space and more movement in the joints. Most one-sided hip pain is due to an habituated Trauma Reflex; this reflex also causes an imbalance in the somatic center, altering one’s gait and ability to maintain proper balance.

Long term muscle function can result in structural damage, however. Labral tears, osteoarthritis can result from decades of muscle dysfunction. Isn’t it be a good idea to learn to take back control of your muscle function and coordination, your balance and your ability to sense and move yourself before jumping into surgery?

In this video I share a wonderful variation of the Side Bend, one of the most important and helpful Somatic Exercises you could ever do for hip joint pain. Try and see how it feels.

Click here for my Pain-Free Legs and Hips DVD, which has plenty of helpful Somatic Exercises to help you release, relax and control the muscles that move your legs and hips.