Is Yoga Dangerous? Not When Done Somatically

In an article called “How Yoga Can Wreck Your Body,” by William J. Broad the question of  yoga injuries is discussed. Many yoga teachers are hesitant to admit that they suffer from injuries. Yoga in its original form is a true somatic discipline (“somatic” meaning being aware of what it feels like to be you). The way it is taught in most yoga studios in the United States is more like fitness than mindful, somatic movement.

For many Yoga students the element of somatic awareness is completely absent. The goal for many is to look like the teacher and get into the posture no matter what. This is how injuries occur.

“Athleticized” Yoga causes injury.

The rise in Yoga injuries and muscle pain says more about the way in which many embrace Yoga than it does about (most) Yoga postures. This is similar to Thomas Hanna’s contention about the source of most back pain:

“The prevalence of back pain has everything to do with the kind of lives that we live and the kind of society in which we live.”

We live in a culture that “athleticizes” everything, and Yoga is high on the list. Yoga can be practiced in a non-competitive way with the sole goal being one of mastering movement and improving posture and breathing. So can life. The answer lies in the awareness of what you’re doing and how you’re doing it.

3 Ways People Get Injured in Yoga

#1 They have Sensory Motor Amnesia (SMA) and don’t know it. As you attempt to perform a Yoga movement, some muscles won’t lengthen fully, while others over-work. You may be able to do an asana on one side (triangle pose, for example), yet not the same way on the other. You keep stretching and breathing, but the muscles don’t release the way you’re told they should.

#2 They don’t know that they are stuck in a full body reflex pattern of muscular imbalance. SMA presents in patterns of contraction. If you’ve had a trauma, regaining muscular balance, symmetry, and coordination is critical before engaging in any sport – much less yoga.

If you do any sport or vigorous activity when your muscles are stuck in a specific Stress Reflex, you’re bound to get injured sooner or later. Certain muscles will be recruited involuntarily when the muscles you’re supposed to be using can’t function optimally

(Hint: Our major goal in Hanna Somatics is to teach you to reverse SMA as it presents within the three somatic reflex patterns. It’s easy and it gives you back control of your body!)

#3 They over-stretch.

You can read more about my take on stretching here. When you stretch a muscle quickly, or beyond its comfortable length, you will evoke the Stretch Reflex. It is a protective spinal cord reflex which contracts the muscle against the stretch to save it from injury. Over-stretching is a major factor in Yoga injuries, from hamstring pulls to lower back injuries.

Instead, learn to pandiculate. Pandiculation resets the muscle length and restores full muscle function at the brain level. In fact, you can easily learn how to pandiculate many of your Yoga stretches!

Ultimately, if you’re getting injured doing yoga, you’re doing something wrong – or you’re overdoing it.

Hanna Somatics and Yoga complement each other. Hanna Somatics can improve your yoga practice and help you prevent many of the common injuries associated with Yoga.  Many Yoga teachers are in fact becoming Hanna Somatic Exercise Coaches and incorporating Somatic Exercises into their classes.

To learn more about Hanna Somatics and how it can help you eliminate chronic muscle pain and regain balance and symmetry, check out the Essential Somatics® store.

2 thoughts on “Is Yoga Dangerous? Not When Done Somatically

  1. I appreciate all these tips. I am in my 20’s and I live in a city that really embraces and loves it’s yoga…and yogi’s! However, the downside to that is this “athleticizing” you speak of. This really turns a positive, healthy median into a dangerous path. I’ve had a couple friends injure themselves during yoga sessions so I will definitely forward this information!

    • Hi Jennifer,

      Thomas Hanna said that Yoga was the first true somatic education. Taught in its purity I would have to agree.

      I have recently been receiving a lot of interest from Yoga teachers (here and in Australia) specifically in my Somatic Exercise Coaching training (details here). My last training class was 3/4 yoga teachers! They all said that they realize that the information taught in Hanna Somatics (specifically stress reflexes, sensory motor amnesia and pandiculation) and the gentle, yet profound Somatic Exercises, can be easily incorporated into one’s yoga classes and practice.

      In fact, as I write in my description of the training, the concepts of Hanna Somatics can help your students prepare to do their yoga better – and without getting injured. Somatics can prep you to regain control of the CNS and proprioception so that you excel at your yoga – without working hard.

      Thanks so much for your comment!
      All the best,
      Martha

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